The Fahs Collaborative Classroom
Teaching that Deepens Faith


"We are at our best when we make our lives and our search for meaning available as a resource for another’s learning. To be a teacher means more than to be a professional who possesses knowledge and skills. It is to have the courage to enter into a common search with others. –  John Westerhoff"


The Collaborative Classroom features educational curricula and resources that promotes a deeper understanding of self and group knowledge inside topic of concern to Unitarian Universallists.  The resources are chosen because of their collaborative practices and thoughtful, aesthetic attention to removing the walls that divide the human family. 


Faith Development, Race & Ethnicity

Beloved Conversations:  Meditations on Race and Ethnicity

In the spirit of a Covenant Group, Beloved Conversations is an experiential and evocative curriculum providing a container for exploring the spiritual and intellectual dimensions of racism in our lives. Over eight sessions, the group encounters ways in which issues of race and ethnicity shapes individual and group assumptions, with each session asking the question:  what must be done in order to interrupt this dynamic?  The curriculum works well as an entry point for discussing issues of race and ethnicity or as an on-going strategy for building anti-racist competency among small groups and/or congregational leadership.   The curriculum begins with a 1.5 weekend retreat, with eight follow-up sessions.  Developed by Mark A. Hicks.  Read more here.

Naming Our Home:  Exploring the Spiritual Journeys of UUs of Color

Using racial/ethnic cultural experiences as a point of departure, this curriculum is designed as a retreat wherein Unitarian Universalists (or  other religious progressive of color) can explore the multiple and often contradictory messages received along the path of reconciling one’s personal faith journey in a context of oppression and marginalization. Through music, movement and the healing power of storytelling, participants do the affirming work of healing spiritual and racial wounds.  Developed by Mark A. Hicks and Qiyamah Rahman.  Contact:  mhicks@meadville.edu for details, scheduling, fee schedule. 

 

Children's Faith Formation

Gaia Brown, a noted relgious educator, returns to Sophia Lyon Fahs and Elizabeth Moore Manwell's 1940 classic, Consider the Children: How They Grow (Beacon Press).  Fahs and Manwell wrote about how the experiences of young children form the basis for their spiritual development.  Gaia Brown returns to this charming and wildly popular text and provides a 21st century update, providing an excellent resource for teachers, parents and anyone who wants to explore how the "germinal experiences" of life maintain power in our lives.  Forthcoming Summer 2013.