What participants are telling us

BIPOC:

“I’ve been doing a lot of reflection about who I’ve become and what I have given up to function in a white world. Thank you for providing the vehicle to touch that part of my soul, that part of my memory.” Sarah G

“Thank you, writers and facilitators. I've found myself again by working through this curriculum while being supported by my pod. It is an excellent program and I'm really grateful for the chance to work through probing lessons as well as the resources you have provided.” Chirinjev P.

“Dear Ones, With all that each of us is going through, during and outside of the pandemic, I am grateful to have THIS community, the curriculum, and not nearly enough time to engage things more fully. However, to have the pod that I have, my Critical Friends, additional and plentiful resources y'all are providing IS providing ways FORWARD into these ever uncertain times. There is much much much to do. Thanks for y'all's holy labor in bringing Beloved Conversations Virtual into being.” Rev. Chris Long, Assistant Minister, The Community Church of New York

White folks:

“Both of you, Kierstin and Julica, truly walk your talk. I felt so embraced and accepted by you...even over zoom!! The resources for the first lesson have broken my heart wide open. I wrote in my journal that I am learning to lead with love. Not 'lead' as a transitive verb, but 'lead' as an undercurrent of my actions and words.” Susan R.  

“What a warm and informative welcome! Thank you to all the organizers. A lot of work ahead, but the materials are wonderful, and I'm psyched to take this important journey.” Karen L.  

“Although I have taught college courses on culturally-sensitive counseling and helping practices and sociological analyses of ethnicity, class, gender, and status, I learned a great deal from this series; it's new ways (to me) of examining oppression, the dynamics between white people and people of color, white supremacy, white fragility, white incredulity, and so much more. It has deepened my commitment to 'follow,’ to work to eliminate racism, to have the courage to speak the truth about oppression, and to consider how to make reparations. The materials were diverse, thought-provoking, deeply touching, and left me always with much to mull over and to talk about with others. Thank you.” Elizabeth M.

“It has been so encouraging to see the growing skills, awareness, and supportive relationships among members of my congregation who participated in Beloved Conversations Virtual. I have witnessed people integrating their learnings about race and applying new practices in covenant within their various leadership positions throughout the church. For example, several of the members of the Social Justice Steering Committee participated in Beloved Conversations Virtual this past fall. Inspired by their learnings and the shared longing to become a more anti-racist church, the team began to rethink how we share our financial resources and choose dedicated plates. We reviewed our patterns of giving over the past decade, looking through a racial equity lens, and discussed what changes we would make to share resources as a form of “followership” and reparations. Conversations were difficult at times as we considered changing our practices and the potential impacts on stakeholders. Members of Beloved Conversations Virtual came into these conversations prepared, not only by what they were learning, but what they were practicing in terms of covenant. They practiced covenant with one another, speaking honestly, directly, and compassionately. They also kept covenant with something larger, the vision of racial equity, repair, and a community transformed. Ultimately, the team made the choice to prioritize giving to Black and Indigenous-led organizations for this church year and will be inviting the congregation into shared reflection about what was learned and our commitment going forward. The team is more focused on racial justice than ever before and more aware of what their leadership role is in shaping the future of the church.” Rev. Beth Chronister, Assistant Minister, University Unitarian Church in Seattle, WA